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Five best day hikes near Auckland

Posted by Website Admin on September 06, 2017

Five best day hikes near Auckland     

We often get asked ‘which walks would you recommend close to Auckland?” We’re so blessed to live surrounded by breathtaking walking tracks that it’s kind of like being asked to choose your favourite child. But if you’ve only got a few days based in the city then here’s some tracks and trails we love like our own.

Auckland’s Coast to Coast (18 km, 5 hours, Difficulty: Moderate)  Where else can you walk across a country in a morning?  This metropolitan walk spans two oceans, volcanoes, views and reveals life in Auckland’s quiet suburban streets. Best of all around two thirds of the walk winds through parks and green spaces. We recommend starting at the least scenic end of industrial Onehunga. Take the train west from downtown’s Britomart station then start walking east towards the city for the stunning harbour views. You’ll earn them! At walk’s end you can reward yourself with a brew beside the Waitemata Harbour, one of the most beautiful harbours in the world. Just a warning, there aren’t many cafes en-route (Cornwall Park) and it’s not well sign posted either so plug the Ferry Building into your phone map or drop into the city iSITE for a trail map.

Te Henga Walkway (12 km, 4 hours, Difficulty: Moderate)  Forming part of the spectacular Hillary Trail, the Te Henga Walkway is a West Auckland walk which crosses the cliff-tops from Bethells to Muriwai.  It’s possibly the most interesting and varied track in the Waitakere Ranges. You’ll need to take two cars and leave a car at each end so you can begin the track from Bethells Road crossing the Waitakere River footbridge where you'll quickly rise to stunning coastal view. Take in Bethells, O'Neill Bay and phenomenal coastal vistas before tackling the staircase exit to Constable Road.  Local’s tip: Pack a picnic and linger for the views.  

Rangitoto Island to Home Bay (15 km, 6 hours, Difficulty: Moderate)  Yes you can walk up the summit but this is where the local’s go for a picturesque blend of volcanic, coastal and farm scenery. Take the inland route from the Rangitoto Wharf to the Islington Bay Wharf, crossing the causeway to Motutapu Island and over farmland to reveal the idyllic Home Bay. Follow the same track back after a much needed break at the campsite or take the Coastal Track back to the Rangitoto Wharf from the Islington Bay Wharf (note this detour will add an hour to your trip). Offering beautiful views and a really unique perspective of the Gulf, plenty of water is required as there's none on either island and careful planning to work with the ferry timetables.

Rotoroa Island  (Allow the whole day)  Another island walk, Rotoroa Island east of Waiheke has recently been reopened to the public after 100 years as a rehab centre. Now thriving with wildlife, visitors can explore the island sanctuary and idyllic bays from Cable Bay on the northern side to Ladies Bay on the east. Catch the once-a-day ferry from downtown in the morning which returns to pick you up later in the day. Take adequate food and supplies. Local’s Tip: Visit Kiwi environmental artist Chris Booth's sculpture on the southern tip of Rotoroa.  

Wenderholm Regional Park (5 km, 1.5 hours, Difficulty: Low)  We’ve left the easiest to last. Drive north some 45 minutes towards Wenderholm Regional Park. Nestled between the inlets of the Waiwera and Puhoi Rivers, the park offers sprawling grass for picnics, plenty of trees to climb, a beautiful white sandy beach and best of all, a lovely loop track suitable for all ages. The Perimeter Track is aptly named as it follows the boundary of the park beginning from the carpark through native bush where Tui and Kereru are abundant. Winding upward there's a great mix of sights, sounds and well-formed steps as you make your way to the top of the track toward spectacular views of the park, Sullivans Bay and Motuora Island. Descending along the cliff edge and back into bush past the old water reservoir catch a glimpse of the historic Couldrey House homestead before spilling out to any number of idyllic picnic spots. On the return journey,  stop at the Waiwera Thermal Pools for a relaxing drip and some hot chips.

Of course, if you’ve only got a day in Auckland then join us on a guided walk for the city’s laneways, legends and loads of local advice.  

For more Auckland walking tracks click here 

Content reproduced in part from Concrete Jungle

 

Auckland's Style Mile

Posted by Website Admin on August 28, 2017

Auckland’s Style Mile

It’s New Zealand Fashion Week so here’s eight spots where Aucklanders shop for fashion all-year-round, all within easy walking distance.  From vintage to avant-garde, and downtown to uptown the locals know where to go.  

1. Start downtown at Britomart for the strip of Kiwi designers.  From Karen Walker and Trelise Cooper, to Kathryn Wilson for shoes. World and Kate Sylvester are also located alongside in nearby Tyler Street. 

2. Pop into MADE on Customs Street for French labels like A.P.C, AMI Paris, and Maison Kitsune, alongside New Zealand designers such as Penny Sage, C'est Moi and M Label. Fondle the knitwear by New Zealand’s own Standard Issue. Along the street is RJB Menswear, for custom tailored suits and classic smart casual wear, perfect if you’re looking to smarten up your look. 

3. If money’s no problem, discover the recent addition of high-end luxury labels on Queen Street, including Gucci, Prada, Louis Vuitton, Dior and Hugo Boss. Both Chanel and Tiffiny add a touch of glamour to Takutai Square. 

4. For bright colours and fabulous tailoring wander up High Street to designer Andrea Moore. Right next door is Pauanesia,  perfect for crafty Kiwi souvenirs if you’re heading offshore. Duck into upper Vulcan Lane to marvel at Gorman’s bright colour palettes and whimsical prints, inspired by Australian nature, culture and tribal history. 

5. Save the earth (and your wallet) at the Recyle Boutique on Darby Street. Once- owned designer threads makes this a popular shopping haunt amongst both city professionals and students. Delight in the discovery of high-end fashion for close to nix.

6. Get your bling at Fingers on Kitchener Street. Bespoke jewellery designed and made by Kiwi artisans, it’s a treasure trove of shimmery shine including pounamu or greenstone inspired Maori art. 

7. Cross the road to the beautiful heritage building of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki. Take a stroll through more than 15,000 traditional and contemporary artworks and marvel at the fashions of generations past.  Best of all the entry is free!

8. Jump on the CityLink Bus and head uptown to Saint Kevins, one of the last old grand arcades remaining in central Auckland. Admire the rockabilly vintage gowns at Rita Sue or the classic shoes at Pat Menzies, an Auckland insitution. Take in the latest tattoo fashions in the design studios which line K’ Road. 

Whatever your tastes - champagne or not, Auckland is a haven for shoppers both young and youthful. So take a walk and hop around the city shops for a fun day out. 
 

Auckland's Top Attraction Revealed

Posted by Website Admin on August 16, 2017

Auckland's Top Attraction Revealed

If you asked an Aucklander what the city’s top visitor attraction is, the answers would likely range from SkyTower (for the views), Kelly Tarlton’s Aquarium (for the penguins) or possibly Waiheke Island (for its vineyard and beaches). And yes the top attraction is an island. But it’s not Waiheke or Rangitoto, the volcanic wonderland in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf.

Auckland’s top tourist attraction, according to Trip Advisor, is actually the island of Tiri Tiri Matangi. This wildlife sanctuary ranks as number one of 270 things to do in Auckland and attracts thousands of visitors each year.

Thirty years ago it was a different story. The 220-hectare island had been stripped of 94% of its native bush, a result of over-intensive farming. Bird life had disappeared. In 1984, volunteers took action planting around 300,000 trees over a ten year period and introducing a pest trapping programme. Today Tiri Tiri Matangi is now 60% forested with the remaining 40% left as grassland for species preferring open habitat.

A number of threatened and endangered species have been successfully introduced, including the flightless takahe and the tuatara. There are few places in New Zealand where you can readily see and walk amongst so many rare species.

On a summer morning, the queue to catch the Tiri ferry snakes its way down Quay Street.  Situated in the Hauraki Gulf, the island is a 75 minute ferry ride away from downtown Auckland (via Gulf Harbour).

The island is a protected haven for native endangered species and is a nature lover’s paradise, particularly for avid birdwatchers. From the moment you step onto the island to the moment you leave, you’ll be serenaded by bird songs while exploring walking tracks through native bush and coastal forests.

But don’t take our word for it, here’s what Jeanne from San Diego wrote on Trip Advisor.

“This is an absolute must visit, a beautiful nature reserve. Once on the island, you are divided into a group of 8-10 people with a volunteer guide who tells about the history of the island, and takes you on a guided hike on several paths, while pointing out the species of birds & plants. Many species can only be found in New Zealand. Several are endangered. The island is a regrown rain forest, full of life and beauty. The excursion takes most of the day. But worth every minute!”

As well as wonderful wildlife, Tiritiri Matangi has a 150 year old lighthouse, a Visitor Centre, some great walks, views and beaches.  Most visitors start with a guided walk which finishes at the Tiritiri Visitor Centre where there are informative displays and a great gift shop with complimentary tea and coffee. All profits from the shop go back to supporting the conservation and education programmes on the island.

The Tiritiri Matangi Island sanctuary is a partnership between the Department of Conservation (DOC) and the community, through the Supporters of Tiritiri Matangi (Inc), a non-profit community conservation organisation.

So if you feel like a walk in the wild, head over to Tiri Tiri Matangi for birds, bush and beautiful bays. A jewel of an island in Auckland’s crown.

 

Best Bites - August is Restaurant Month

Posted by Website Admin on July 21, 2017

Best Bites - August is Restaurant Month

August is when Aucklanders are enticed out of their warm winter burrows by restaurants offering great deals. With 100 eateries offering set menus at great prices ranging from $25, $40 and $55, why bother cooking another curry or lasagne?

While others head off to sunnier shores, pretend this is your winter vacay, throw the diet to the wind and head into the heart of the city. Spoilt for choice,  Aucky Walky have done the hard work for you and canvassed the best deals revealing 7 diverse options from Italian, to Thai to Kiwi style bistros - all at $25 per head. Some of which include a glass of sangria or barista coffee. That should see you through the first week at least. 

Bon appeitit everyone!

El Faro's, Elliott Stables, 39 Elliott St, midcity
$25 FOR A 2 COURSE DINNER OR LUNCH INCLUDING A SANGRIA
2 courses + sangria: options include slow roasted pork with patatas bravas and churros con chocolat matched with a glass of sangria.

Chuffed on High Street
$25 FOR A 3 COURSE LUNCH INCLUDING A COFFEE
3 courses + a coffee: includes 1/2 cheese toastie, soup of the day and slice from their cabinet matched with any coffee

Culpepper Shed 22, Princes Wharf
$25 FOR A 2 COURSE DINNER OR LUNCH.
2 courses: options include chipotle fried chicken, kimchi aioli and seared market fish with green papaya slaw, nam jim dressing, crispy shallot

Ortolana at The Pavillions, Britomart
$25 FOR A 2 COURSE LUNCH.
3 course dinner: options include garlic, rosemary, mozzarella piadina with beef short rib, mushroom, fava hummus and gelato on a stick
2 course lunch: options include organic chicken cotoletta with lemon, kale, walnut and gelato on a stick 

Mexico on Tyler St, Britomart
$25 FOR A 2 COURSE DINNER OR LUNCH.
2 courses: includes xocolate beef cheek with celeriac puree, yeast battered zucchini flower and 'Bread of the dead' with Dulce de Leches, orange, cardomom glaze 

The Federal Deli - Federal Street, opposite SkyCity
$25 FOR A 2 COURSE DINNER OR LUNCH.
2 courses: includes spit roast chicken, creamy coleslaw and potato and gravy with NY cheesecake

Thai Street - 3/12 Jellicoe Street, Wynyard Quarter, 
$25 FOR A 2 COURSE DINNER.
2 courses: options include lemongrass chicken wings and hot pot with caramelised pork belly, sweet soy, star anise, cinnamon sticks with jasmine

For more options, check out the Restaurant Month website. 

Could Albert Park be Auckland's next Tunnel?

Posted by Website Admin on June 22, 2017

Could Albert Park be Auckland's next Tunnel?

Hundreds of Auckland university students stroll down the steps of Albert Park each day unaware of the exciting opportunity beneath their feet.

Aucky Walky tour takers are fascinated to learn that the city’s air raid shelters lie under the tranquil city park. And they’re excited by one man’s vision to create a new underground cycle and walkway linking Victoria Street to Parnell and the Auckland Domain. So while the opening of the new Waterview Tunnel is a major breakthrough, there's potentially another city tunnel project which could help move people, both physically and emotionally.

When World War 2 broke out in the Pacific, a real threat existed that Auckland would be bombed by the Japanese. It was considered a major risk for the city’s population of 400,000 at the time.

So a plan was actioned to tunnel 3.5 km of rock out of Albert Park to create air raid shelters, reaching from Constitution Hill to Wellesley Street. The tunnels, completed in 1942 were mainly hand-dug by council workers, most of whom were middle-aged men deemed unfit for war.

The shelters included sanitation facilities, kitchens and first aid stations all ventilated by air shafts substantial enough to accommodate 20,000 city workers.

The war passed and Auckland was fortunate enough to escape attack.Unfortunately the timber supports in the unused tunnels then began to rot and collapse so the shelters were backfilled with 8.8 million bricks.  All nine entrances were sealed and buried by 1946. Three of the blocked entrances are located behind the scoria wall at the Park's Victoria Street entry.

Since then, a number of schemes have been proposed to reopen the tunnels.

Over twenty years ago tourism promoter Bill Reid gained permission to unseal the tunnels and perform an inspection, with a view to developing a tourist attraction.  Various changes in Council and priorities stalled Bill’s progress, however the intrepid advocate persevered and has recently conducted promising tunnel talks with both ATEED and Auckland Transport.

The prospect of a dual walk-cycle way linking Victoria Street east to Parnell is an exciting prospect.The strong belief that glow worms caves exist in the volcanic rock would be a tourism bonanza.   

This week the Tunnel Team are meeting with Auckland Mayor Phil Goff.

Successful tourism operator Waitomo Adventures are lending their support to the plan.

Auckland needs innovative attractions downtown and this seems like a venture worthy of full Council and ATEED backing. If we can fund a national cycleway with variable usage then this project, potentially benefiting thousands of people per day, is overdue a feasibility study.

You can follow Bill’s progress here on the Albert Tunnels Facebook page  

photo credit: Albert Tunnels Facebook Page - Nicolas Reid, Transport Planning Consultant